Are we missing something?

It happened again last week. Leaders of a social services agency were hauled before a legislative committee to Silhouette of helping hand between two climberexplain why vulnerable people under their care were injured or died.

This time, the leaders represented Child Protective Services (CPS), the Texas agency responsible for the protection of children in foster care.

It happened 20 years ago when I was spokesperson for what was then known as the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation. The heads of my agency would be subpoenaed to testify at the state capitol about cases of abuse, neglect and death at state institutions.

Lawmakers always expressed outrage. The agency leaders always expressed regret and promised to do better.

History repeats itself — everywhere

This kind of historical repetition is not unique to Texas. It happens all over the country.

In the 1960s, the late Sen. Robert Kennedy toured Willowbrook State School on Staten Island, New York, and was appalled at the conditions he found. He told reporters afterward that people treat their pets better than the mentally disabled children were being treated at Willowbrook.

There was a huge public outcry, but nothing changed at the school. A few years later, television reporter Geraldo Rivera took a camera inside Willowbrook and captured on film the abusive and neglectful conditions.

There was another public outcry and legislative investigations. Money was appropriated and agency leaders promised to do better.

It seems to go in cycles. Every few years, there are news reports of vulnerable people – living under the supposed watchful eye of a tax-supported agency – who have been killed or badly hurt.

 We’ve heard all this before

This week, the leaders of CPS said they were taking aggressive steps to protect foster kids. Foster parents are being more closely scrutinized. Foster children are being visited more often. Training of case workers has been ramped up so they can better spot abuse. Technology is being upgraded and abuse prevention programs are being launched.

One senator said he had heard all these kinds of promises before. He wondered what is different this time. Another senator remarked that they must be missing something.

Both senators are right. They’ve heard all this before. And they are missing something.

What they are missing – what we all are missing – is that these outrageous situations will continue to occur as long as we underfund social services.

And even then, even if we provide adequate funding, the deaths and injuries will not end. We can only get close to that goal when each of us assumes responsibility for all of our vulnerable citizens – including children, people with disabilities and the elderly.

Making a more decent society

I like what my colleague J. David Smith, professor emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, says about this issue.

Dr. Smith, who has written extensively about the treatment of people with disabilities, says we don’t have to all become social workers or in some way devote our lives to caring for these folks. We don’t have to all be like the Good Samaritan in the Bible, who risked his life and social standing to help someone others had shunned.

“We need more acutely, however, the day-to-day caring of the Minimal Decent Samaritans,” he wrote in his excellent book Ignored, Shunned and Invisible: How the Label “Retarded” has Denied Freedom and Dignity to Millions.

“It is that quality in ourselves and others that makes for a more decent society.”

To that, I say a hearty amen.