Disability newsbits

Deja vu revisited

Every once in awhile, public discourse focuses on the pros and cons of euthanasia. The issue is in the headlines in Belgium right now because that country’s Senate has voted to allow euthanasia for terminally ill children.

As the New York Times points out, euthanasia for children has been taboo in most countries ever since Nazi Germany put to death thousands of mentally and physically handicapped children during what was known as Kinder Euthanasie.

The Germans weren’t the only people who believed that so-called “defective” children should be eliminated. There was a strong eugenics movement in the United States 100 years ago and one of its results was that many states passed sterilization laws. These laws were designed to ensure that people with disabilities, those who were poor and others who lived on the edges of life could not reproduce.

There were also news stories about doctors who refused to treat newborns who had deformities. In one such case, a doctor in Chicago allowed a baby boy to die because his head was fused to his shoulder and he was born with a closed intestine. The child’s parents agreed with the doctor’s decision.

A hundred years later, we’re still debating the issue in some form or fashion.

Healthy lifestyles for people with disabilities

This is the final week for Paralympics in Sochi, and many people many not be clear on who these sporting events are for. The Paralympics are for individuals with physical disabilities. Competitors do not have intellectual handicaps, as do those who participate in the Special Olympics – a completely separate set of games.

As the Montreal Gazette points out, even though Special Olympics has been around for many decades, its focus has not necessarily been on healthy lifestyles for people with intellectual disabilities. These individuals often take more medications than people in the general population, yet they are not as likely to get routine exams for eyes, teeth and ears.

“Sport, health and healthy lifestyles can become powerful vectors in promoting the inclusion and social participation of people with an intellectual disability,” wrote Diane Morin, holder of the Chair of Intellectual Disabilities and Behavioural Disorders at the Université du Québec á`Montréal.

For that reason, it’s good to read that Special Olympics Quebec is offering special health clinics for athletes.

A teaching hotel

You’ve heard of teaching hospitals. How about a teaching hotel? My hat’s off to Marriott Hotels for its plans to build a hotel in Muncie, Indiana, staffed in part by people with disabilities.

The hotel will double as a training facility for individuals who want to go into the hospitality and food service industries. At the same time, it will provide training for human resource professionals in how to hire more employees with disabilities.

The idea for the hotel came from a dad who was frustrated at the lack of postsecondary opportunities for his son, who has Down Syndrome.

I hope to read more stories like this in the future as people with disabilities become more a part of our everyday lives. Read more about what the Brookwood Communities in Houston and Georgetown are doing to provide postsecondary work opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities on my previous blog post.